Sony Launches Three New 4K HDR Home Cinema Projectors

Sony Launches Three New 4K HDR Home Cinema Projectors

Sony Electronics Inc. today at CEDIA EXPO 2018, the global showcase of the future home, announced the launch of three new home cinema projector models to further enhance consumers' immersive viewing experience. Pursuing the highest true 4K quality for the home, the new VPL-VW995ES laser projector is equipped with an innovative All Range Crisp Focus (ARC-F) lens, which was introduced in 2012 with Sony's first 4K home projector, the VPL-VW1000ES, and is currently found in Sony's flagship consumer projector, the VPL-VW5000ES. The ARC-F lens provides the best focus and resolution across the entire the screen with the new Digital Focus Optimizer function.

Take Control of Your Internet

With a new Sound & Vision network, featuring OvrC Home parental controls, you can manage Wi-Fi access right from your phone or mobile device.

Wi-Fi Management

With Wi-Fi access management, you can easily manage your home’s wireless devices. Easy-to-setup user profiles allow you to schedule and restrict Wi-Fi access as you see fit. Limit child Internet access during dinner time, bed time, or any time. 

Edit Profiles

Pause Profiles


Content Filtering

This feature gives you the ability to filter out and block select URLs from being accessed. You're able to select one of four levels that range from just blocking malicious URLs all the way up to very stringent filters.

 


Fix Issues With The Touch Of A Button

When it’s late at night, early in the morning, or when it’s not convenient to call us, use OvrC Home personalized for you, to resolve many common issues.

Crestron Integration with Apple TV, Siri, and HomeKit Announced

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Homeowners will soon be able to control Apple TV with their voice through Crestron remotes, and use Siri to control their Crestron-driven home.

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Crestron will soon be providing a next-generation user experience for Crestron home systems. Announced at Apple’s WWDC 2018 conference, Crestron Technology Professionals will soon be able to leverage the power of Apple TV, Siri, and HomeKit to enhance their clients’ lifestyles and user experience. 
 
This new integration will bring two important benefits to Crestron customers. First, it will enable IP control of Apple TV, including voice commands via the TSR-310 touchscreen remote control. And second, it allows users to use Siri on their iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, or HomePod to control the Crestron devices in their home such as lights, shades and thermostats.
 
“We are working to ensure a complete technology solution for Crestron Technology Professionals and homeowners,” says John Clancy, VP of Residential at Crestron. “An overwhelming percentage of our residential customers use Apple products as part of their home technology ecosystems, and delivering a seamless integration between Crestron technology and Apple solutions will absolutely enhance the homeowner’s user experience.”    

What is HDR TV (and why should you care)?

Digital Trends has a great deep dive on all things HDR and why you want it.

HDR: The basics

Contrast is measured by the difference between the brightest whites and darkest blacks a TV can display, as measured in candelas per square meter (cd/m2), known as nits. The ideal low end is completely black, or zero nits — currently only possible on OLED displays, which can turn pixels completely off. On the high end, it’s a different story. Standard dynamic range TVs generally produce 300 to 500 nits, but some HDR TVs aim much, much higher — thousands of nits even.

Multiple formats for displaying HDR are possible, but currently there are two major players: the proprietary Dolby Vision format and the open standard HDR10. Dolby was first to the party, displaying a prototype TV capable of displaying up to 4,000 nits of brightness. For a short time, Dolby Vision was essentially synonymous with HDR, but not every manufacturer wanted to play by Dolby’s rules (or pay its fees), and many started working on their own alternatives. Companies quickly realized that this could lead to madness, and many popular manufacturers, including LG, Samsung, Sharp, Sony, and Vizio, eventually agreed on an open standard called HDR10.

In April 2016, the UHD Alliance — an industry group made up of companies like Samsung, LG, Sony, Panasonic, Dolby, and many others — announced the Ultra HD Premium certification for UHD Blu-ray players. This benchmark sets some baseline goals for HDR, such as the ability to display up to 1,000 nits of brightness and feature a minimum of 10-bit color depth. Both HDR10 and Dolby Vision meet the standards set by the certification, but how the two go about it varies greatly.